Monthly Archives: April 2020

The Psychology of Social Distancing

Psychology of Social Distancing
With emptier roads, and people wanting to be well spaced out on the pavements, it is far more common for people to run or walk in the road. Cyclists are also more likely to go in the road where there is a cycleway, even if it is against another set of rules – The Highway Code.
Psychology of Social Distancing
At the end of Wilsham Road there is a warning sign about pedestrians.

M sent an email which prompted this post. He said ‘I have had a lot of incidents when I have had to move aside because someone else refused to, or runners and cyclists rush past me with no attempt to keep 2 metres away. They are more dangerous than walkers as their breath is stronger, and I read that one should immediately step aside if caught in the slipstream of one who has just gone past.’

He also mentions a cyclist on the pavement that forced him as a pedestrian into the road. He shouted after the cyclist and they scowled back.

Somebody I know, who is strict about abiding by the rules, says she was incensed when her neighbour had visitors round for a noisy Bar-B-Q.

At Tesco with the new direction arrows, most people follow the arrows. My wife pointed the arrows out to another shopper who was consistently going against the suggested route.
Psychology of Social Distancing
Whereas a lot of people abide by the rules about distancing, others appear to carry on much as before.  They may have other things on their mind (such as a mobile phone). They may not want to be told how to behave.

Maybe a psychologist will do a study called ‘The Psychology of Social Distancing.’

Abingdon Corona Virus response group update

First Swallow
Diana sent this rainbow of colour which made her smile when taking her walk down the Radley Road yesterday.
First Swallow
Julian updated me on the Abingdon Corona Virus response group to be found on Facebook. Here are some of the the actions put in place:
* An emergency response team for the council.
* A cross-town team taking on deliveries for the co-op and the foodbank, plus providing ‘overflow’ capacity for ‘regular’ requests
* They have 3 area reps and 29 neighbourhood coordinators and 500 active volunteers
* They postcarded nearly 17,000 houses
* They are working with AbiMeds

There are now got 550 hi-viz jackets for all Street Coordinators to wear, so that they are instantly recognisable as being part of the group. Abingdon-on-Thames Town Council funded those and also 20 litres of hand sanitizer and 190 small bottles. S.E. Workwear helped supply the jackets.

Julian says ‘All of this is a great town effort, from people, many of who have never met, who are embracing their community and helping out anyone who is vulnerable in these challenging times.‘ He gives special mention to Sarah ‘Sez’ Anthony,  who has instigated and set up the group.
First Swallow
The thoughts for the day (top right) are not happening over the weekend. I did spot this bible verse on our walk today down Spring Road.

First Swallow, Goose Communism, and Isis demolished

First Swallow
There were swallows near Abingdon Bridge this morning. Having recently arrived back after wintering south of the Sahara, they were feeding on the clouds of insects over the River Thames. This swallow is pictured over the roof of Annie’s Tearoom.
First Swallow
Near the tearoom were geese with young. They seem to be communal birds: a group of adults look after the young.
First Swallow
Unhatched eggs are also kept in a communal way.
First Swallow
After a mild winter, the Plane trees on St Helen’s Wharf are coming back into leaf.
First Swallow
A little further along, on Wilsham Road, a bungalow, called Isis, has been demolished, and is being replaced by a four bedroom house.

Barton Fields in April

Barton Fields in April
I am visiting Barton Fields for a picture report every month this year.
Barton Fields in April
It was another bright sunny day. There have been many such days since the Lockdown began. The fine weather encourages us to enjoy nature.

During the lockdown there are more people than usual visiting the area as part of their exercise allowance.
Barton Fields in April
The Thames Path leaves Barton Fields by a wooden bridge before meandering round a fishing lake towards the River Thames. More people than usual seem to be smiling or saying hello as we pass at a distance. Somebody said recently that it could best described as ‘physical distancing’ rather than ‘social distancing’.
Barton Fields in April
There are smaller paths that go through Barton Fields allowing more ways to avoid other people physically.
Barton Fields in April
Today was St George’s Day. England’s National Flower is the rose and the path passes close to these rose like flowers – possibly apples.
Barton Fields in April
There are Hawthorn Bushes / May Trees seen here next to last year’s hay.
Barton Fields in April
Cutting the meadow with scythes, and piling tbe hay, encourages wild flowers to take hold. There are many Cowslips growing among the short April grass.
Barton Fields in April
There are many other wildflowers dotted about. I think these are bugles.