Category Archives: pandemic

People in Lockdown

Abingdon floods
Somebody was meditating on a seat in the Abbey Meadows. That is one way to escape lockdown.
Abingdon floods
The new town council notice boards are no longer blank. A map of Abingdon town centre has been placed below two sheets about services that are closed at the moment, and the slogan – Stay Home – Protect the NHS – Save Lives.
Abingdon floods
Abingdon Museum is closed and have a project recording people’s stories of lockdown.
Abingdon floods
People in their 70s are now getting the virus vaccine. The government announced today that over ten million people in the UK have had one of the vaccines. Some people from Abingdon are going to the mass vaccination centre at the Kassam Stadium in Oxford. I saw others queuing at the charter day center today for their jab.

Another news report said that a single dose of AstraZeneca vaccine could cut transmission by 67%. Teachers, the police, and shop workers, come into contact with lots of people as part of their job, but I don’t think they get the vaccine yet. The priority is on safeguarding the most vulnerable.

Abingdon Residents gather on doorsteps to applaud Captain Sir Tom Moore and the NHS

Abingdon floods
People in the UK (including Abingdon on Thames) returned to doorsteps at 6pm to applaud a 100-year-old veteran who had raised almost £33m for NHS charities by walking laps of his garden. He died yesterday with Covid-19.
Abingdon floods
Residents of West St Helen Street were led by John, whose drum helped to bring out residents who had not heard of the proposed doorstep applause.

John said that he had intended to do one on Thursday at 8pm but then the Prime Minister announced the national applause for Wednesday at 6pm.

Lockdown 3 – bird watching

Like many people we have not been out a lot since lockdown 3 started on January 5th. A surge of Covid-19 cases led to hospital intensive care units becoming full, or near capacity, and so the government put in place this lockdown.
Lockdown 3
Today we stayed in, and I waited for visitors to come to us – for some pictures for the blog.

The birds must have plenty of other food out there because our well stocked bird feeder doesn’t seem to be getting many visitors this winter. I did see a flurry of sparrows at breakfast and then it was quiet again.
Lockdown 3
There have also been lone blue tits that flit in quickly and away again.
Lockdown 3
A Wood Pigeon landed in one of the trees. Usually the other birds throw so much food about that there is lots on the ground for Wood Pigeons to vacuum up, but not today.
Lockdown 3
A flock of pigeons circles round one of the houses in St Helen’s Court.
Lockdown 3
Flocks of gulls glide over as the sun goes down.

Chinese workers in Abingdon Cemetery from the First World War

Cut Trees
During the First World War there was a need for labour as part of the war effort, and many Chinese Mariners served on UK vessels. Some of these became stranded in the UK and found other work. Two such men have been buried together at the bottom of the Spring Road Cemetery in Abingdon. Anne sent me an email asking whether, in these days of pandemic, they had been victims of the influenza pandemic.

An article in the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch Vol. 60 (2020), titled The Chinese mariners of the First World War, says that there were 67 Influenza fatalities recorded among Chinese Mariners, serving on UK vessels, all but one after July 1918.

Muk Cheung, of Bao’an, an area of the city of Shenzhen, worked at the stores depot at Milton Barracks, and died in Abingdon Cottage Hospital of pneumonia on February 10th 1918, aged 31 years.

Ah Fook, possibly of Hong Kong, worked at the stores depot at Milton Barracks, and died in Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, of an aneurysm on April 13th 1918, aged 33 years.