Category Archives: politics

Abingdon-on-Thames Town Council Meeting – 29th January 2020

Town Council Meeting
The Amenities Committee resolved to allow the grazing of sheep within the meadow area of the Spring Road Cemetery on a trial basis. Members also resolved to permit bee hives in the area with appropriate warning notices.
Town Council Meeting
The Council agreed to ask council officers to investigate disposing of the land north of the pedestrian subway in Stratton Way. It has become a site of anti-social behaviour, was difficult to maintain and had little amenity value. Officers will now investigate and report back on possible uses.
Town Council Meeting
It is back to the drawing board. The recently elected Lib-Dem Council are to undertake a Neighbourhood Development Plan. As people may remember the previous Conservative council started a Community Led Plan but it did not get completed. Before that South Abingdon undertook a South Abingdon Residents Plan which did not get completed. The Council will first advertise for a consultant to undertake the Neighbourhood Development Plan. They will then shortlist, and appoint a consultant to scope the plan.

The Mayor reported that he or the deputy Mayor had attended 45 events since the last Town Council meeting. He highlighted the Over 70s Party and thanked Hilton Garden Hotel for hosting the event. He attended the John Mason Chater Day and had to field lots of difficult questions from scholars of John Mason about Abingdon’ history. Last week he attended a Holocaust Memorial 75th Anniversary event and quoted the German Pastor Niemoller:
First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—
     Because I was not a socialist.

Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out—
     Because I was not a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

Town Council Meeting
The Green Advisory and Scrutiny Committee are due to receive an energy audit report arranged by Abingdon Carbon Cutters, and undertaken by Oxford Brookes University at no cost to the council. It is hoped this will highlight some immediate actions to reduce the carbon footprint of the council. The committee is looking for CO2 & NOx reductions. They are also looking at Bikes and Buses and promoting their use.

The budget was set by the council for next year. This will be funded by a precept of £1,633,160 (tax paid by Abingdon Council Tax Payers); about £40,000 from reserves, and some money from fees and charges. Not every item in the budget was shown in the papers, just some highlights. Last year’s precept was £1,549,607. The Town Bus Service was not mentioned directly but it was said £15K would go towards green transport. It was also said that in some areas the Council would have to spend to save. The Guildhall has 70% of the Town Council energy usage and future plans include replacing the roof, lighting and heating system, and adding double glazing.
Town Council Meeting
I also see the council are considering re-introducing a lift up the stairs of the guildhall for the Cinema. In December the lift at the back of the building broke down and could not be mended immediately.

There will be 4 Town Crier magazines a year as part of the council communications strategy. New notice boards have been ordered for Stratton Lodge and Roysse Court. Officers are trying to locate a manufacturer of a circular noticeboard to be sited in the Market Place.

Councillors are reported to be keen on tree planting on Abingdon Common ( across the A34 from Tesco) which is owned, in part, by the Town Council and a report has been requested on that.

Among the grants from the Town Council (and the JET fund it controls), towards improving the town fabric:
* £2,000 will go towards St Nicolas Church Tower to preserve the tower fabric and enable the bells to be rung again.

* £11,000 is needed towards work on the war memorial itself, the stonework and topping. Previous work, a few years ago, was to stabilise the structure.

* £5,000 will go towards work needed on the Albert Memorial following a periodic inspection which estimates work needed of £24,500.

* £25,000 will go towards the Friends of Abingdon, Abbey Buildings initial development phase.

In terms of larger grants towards social needs:

* There was a grant of £7,000 towards Be Free -Young Carers, something that does not get funding by Oxford County Council Social Services.

* The annual grant to the Oxfordshire South and Vale Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) will go up from £15,100 to £18,100. John Bright, a Director, had given a presentation before the council meeting saying 2,000 people had attended the Abingdon service last year, a 15% increase. The largest areas of concern from people attending the CAB are benefits and debts. The CAB did try out an outreach service at Abingdon Carousel last year but it didn’t work there.

* There was also an annual grant to Abingdon Bridge (young people’s counselling and support service).

High Profile planning applications that had been considered during this cycle of the Town Council included:

* Army Rowing Club development on Wilsham Road – Town Council recommended refusal – VWHDC allowed.

* The Knowl, 52 Stert Street, turn to multiple Occupancy – Town Council recommended refusal – VWHDC allowed.

* The application to build flats on the sports fields next to Abingdon United Football Ground – Town Council recommended refusal – VWHDC refused and it went to appeal.

* Land North of Dunmore Road – the Town Council reiterated the need for the A34 interchange to be built before most of the houses. (Timescales were released for that project last year but as far as I could make out it still is being delayed by Highway England).

In one recent planning meeting a member of the public had complained about people not getting any notification about works on Stratton Way that brought the town to a halt. Councillors replied the Town Council often did not get notified either.
Town Council Meeting
There was a lot more in the 144 pages of council minutes. This is a brief selection and not all of even this was discussed at tonight’s meeting. It was good to see an Abingdon Herald reporter at the meeting. She waited around to do some interviews afterwards. I left the building at 8:40 pm.

Voting in Abingdon

Voters in Abingdon voted in the UK’s third general election in five years, and the second election in 2019. Key issues were Brexit and the NHS.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
The vast majority of signs round Abingdon were Lib-Dem. The majority of the literature we received was also Lib-Dem.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
There was surprisingly little literature from the Conservatives, and fewer Conservative signs than usual. There were no high profile visits.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
Labour brought us a couple of leaflets.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
There was one leaflet from the Brexit Party.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
It was a wet polling day. The rain got heavier after about 10 am and eased off towards evening.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
Umbrellas were common at the polling stations where there was little parking, including Trinity, and the Guildhall,
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
and St John’s Ambulance station.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
There were fewer umbrellas where parking was easier. The tellers at Preston Road and Long Furlong told me there was a good turnout.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
The road was blocked near the Northcourt Centre Polling Station as new gas mains are being put in.
MP for Oxford West & Abingdon
Candidates for Oxford West & Abingdon were Layla Moran (Liberal Democrats), James Frederickson (Conservatives), Rosie Sourbut (Labour), and Allison Wild (Brexit Party).

The result was:
Layla Moran (Liberal Democrats) 31,340 votes (held seat)
James Frederickson (Conservatives) 22,397 votes
Rosie Sourbut (Labour) 4,258 votes
Allison Wild (Brexit Party) 829 votes.

Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings 2019

Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings
The candidates for the Oxford West & Abingdon constituency in 2019 are:
James Fredrickson – Conservative
Layla Moran – Liberal Democrat
Rosie Sourbut – Labour
Allison Wild – Brexit Party.
Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings
All four were there to answer questions put by people from Abingdon. The event was organised by Abingdon-on-Thames Chamber of Commerce, and the Church in Abingdon. There was a retiring collection for the Church in Abingdon to pay for putting on the event. Like the previous hustings in May 2017, the event was chaired by Chris Bryan who welcomed the four candidates and said “Here we are again.”
Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings
The evening began with each candidate saying how they came to be standing for parliament. This provided a personal introduction before we got into the politics.

Layla Moran had got into politics because, as a teacher, she could see the educational system was not being run to get the best outcomes for children.

James Fredrickson had come from an IT background and recognised that with better connectivity and use of technology care services could be run better. Carers could spent more time with people and less on the road.

Rosie Sourbut had volunteered at a foodbank and saw the effect of Universal Credit on people in desperate need.

Allison Wild was a businesswoman, and ended by saying she was inspired by Brexit and being able to trade with the world on good terms and not just Europe.
Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings
There were 7 questions asked during the evening. They were:

  • What would your government do to make the world a safer place?
  • How would your party’s policies help and support Abingdon Town Centre?
  • There is a Climate Emergency. How would you fight to bring it to the top of the government agenda?
  • Brexit could lead to the break up of the UK. Is the breakup of the UK more important than economic arguments?
  • How would you improve the supply of affordable homes, help the homeless, and support people in private rental housing?
  • What are your views on Abortion?
  • How will your party pay for all its promises to the electorate, or are they impossible promises?

Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings
There were not many party activists in the hustings from what I could tell and there was not the usual partisan cheering or booing of candidates. Only the best answers got applause.

With just over a week remaining to the election activists are probably busy trying to reach people, not just in the hall, with leaflets and phone calls. The hall itself was only half full.
Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings
The big question about the Oxford-Cambridge expressway was not asked, and there was not a full-on Brexit question. No questions on the NHS or education either.

Abingdon is a marginal so your vote can make a difference between these four candidates.

Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings 2019

Oxford West & Abingdon Hustings 2019
There will be a husting for the general election on 2nd December. Questions need to be in by 28th November.

The candidates for the Oxford West & Abingdon constituency in 2019 are:
James Fredrickson – Conservative
Layla Moran – Liberal Democrat
Rosie Sourbut – Labour
Allison Wild – Brexit Party.

It may not be quite as exciting as the hustings in 1865, which I read about in the Reading Mercury in the British Newspaper Archive, but you never know, …

“On Monday last, the nomination of Candidates for the Representation of this County in Parliament, took place Abingdon. The hustings was erected in the Market-place, opposite the Queen’s Hotel. The windows at the County Hall, and every available space on the roof of the building, were crowded with ladies and gentlemen who appeared to take great interest in the proceedings. Special trains, engaged by both the Liberal and Conservative candidates, brought a considerable number of electors from all parts of the county, and although there was an absence of flags and banners, and even bands of music, the Market-place presented a lively and exciting appearance. The Conservatives mustered in great strength at the Crown and Thistle Hotel, and were first to march to the hustings. The Liberal candidates and their friends quickly followed from the Queen’s Hotel, and both parties were received with cheers from their supporters. During the progress of the proceedings, many noisy interruptions occurred, and the Conservative party were certainly not so courteous to the speakers on the Liberal side as their opponents were during the delivery of the Conservative addresses. It was evident that the Conservatives had done their utmost to bring together a large body of men, and it was also evident that some of their party possessed stentorian voices, which were freely and coarsely used to drown the unpleasant and distasteful remarks of gentlemen on ‘the other side.’ …”